Containers and packages lost at sea

The aim of this operational guide is to provide the information necessary for an initial decision to be taken even before any precise information from the shipping companies involved is available.

The aim of this operational guide is to provide the information necessary for an initial decision to be taken even before any precise information from the shipping companies involved is available.
 
Under the conditions prevailing at the beginning of a crisis, a hurried assessment of the situation and of the dangers involved is a potential source of blunders and errors that may lead to an aggravation of the situation.
 
General information about the containers and their contents is easily accessible and reference to it may enable major mistakes through undue haste, negligence or ignorance to be avoided.
 
The initial assessment will naturally develop gradually as the information becomes more precise following investigations carried out by the response authorities in charge.
 
This guide is intended mainly for:
• personnel on board ships involved in taking action;
• personnel, on board or not, responsible for airborne operations;
• any official responsible for operations dealing with packages lost at sea.

 

Table of contents

 

A WARNING, NOTIFICATION, INITIAL STEPS

A.1 - Loss reported by ship where the incident occurred
A.2 - Unknown package located by chance
A.3 - Unknown package recovered accidentally
A.4 - Notification, initial steps

 

B DESCRIPTION OF PACKAGES

B.1 - Drums
B.1a - High density polyethylene (HDPE) or plastic drums
B.1b - Steel or lacquered iron drums
B.1c - Kraft drums
B.2 - General-purpose containers
B.3 - Tank containers

 

C BEHAVIOUR OF PACKAGES

C.1 - Resistance to environmental attack
C.2 - Determination of the buoyancy of an object
C.3 - Estimation of drift
C.4 - Estimation of motion produced on the seabed

 

D SUBSTANCES TRANSPORTED

D.1 - IMO (International Maritime Organization) classifications of goods
D.1a - MARPOL classification
D.1b - IMDG classification
D.2 - Labelling of packages

 

E RISK PROFILES

E.1 - Harmless substances
E.2 - Dangerous substances
E.2a - MARPOL substances A and B: explosives, reagents, toxic substances
E.2b - MARPOL substances C and D
E.2c - GESAMP assessment of risk profiles
E.3 - Unknown substances: no markings

 

F DECISION-MAKING

F.1 - MARPOL substances A
F.2 - MARPOL substances B, C and D
F.3 - Explosives
F.4 - Other substances capable of exploding and reacting (IMO 2.1, 3, 4, 5 and 8)
F.5 - Toxic substances (IMO 6 and 2.3)
F.6 - Harmless substances

 

G SEARCHING

G.1 - Surface searches
G.1a - Visual detection
G.1b - Side-looking airborne radar (SLAR)
G.2 - Underwater search and detection
G.2a - Echo sounding
G.2b - Multibeam sonars
G.2c - Sonars used in minesweeping
G.2d - Towed sonars
G.2e - Magnetometry
G.2f - Underwater cameras

 

H MARKING, BEACONING

H.1 - Surface marking
H.1a - Choice of float
H.1b - Identification
H.2 - Marking on the sea-bed
H.3 - Increasing the buoyancy

 

i RECOVERY, DESTRUCTION

i.1 - Recovery of floating drums
i.2 - Recovery of floating containers
I.2a - Taking on board
I.2b - Towing
i.3 - Recovery of drums lying on the sea-bed
i.4 - Recovery of a container lying on the sea-bed
i.4a - Action by divers
i.4b - Use of manned submersibles or remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs)
i.5 - Destruction

 

J MONITORING OF DEVELOPMENTS

 

 

The file below is an extract. To order the full version in printed or electronic form, please send an email to: documentation@cedre.fr

Document

Editor
Cedre
Date
30/04/2001
Paper version
25 € (pdf: 25 €)