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Aerial observation of oil pollution at sea

The first vocation of this operational guide is to be present onboard all aircraft likely to be involved in aerial observation of oil pollution at sea. However it is also a useful tool in pollution response centres and as a technical support for public relations personnel.

The first vocation of this operational guide is to be present onboard all aircraft likely to be involved in aerial observation of oil pollution at sea. However it is also a useful tool in pollution response centres and as a technical support for public relations personnel.

 

 

Table of contents

 

A THE MISSION

A.1 - The aims of reconnaissance flights
A.2 - Preparing the mission
A.3 - Flight profile

 

B DIFFERENT TYPES OF HYDROCARBONS

B.1 - Oil and oil products
B.2 - Basic physical characteristics

 

C EVOLUTION OF OIL AT SEA

C.1 - The first few days
C.2 - Photographic imagery of the evolution of oil at sea

 

D APPEARANCE OF OIL SLICKS

D.1 - General overview
D.2 - Special cases
D.3 - Topography of oils slicks at sea
D.4 - Arrival of oil on the coast

 

E DRIFT OF OIL SLICKS

E.1 - Calculation of drift
E.2 - Information and data transmission
E.3 - Slick drift model
E.4 - Use of drifting buoys

 

F OIL SPILL OBSERVATION

F.1 - Observation criteria
F.2 - Bonn Agreement Oil Appearance Code
F.3 - Appearance at sea
F.4 - Observation on the coast
F.5 - Photographic and video imagery
F.6 - Remote sensing

 

G GUIDING RESPONSE OPERATIONS

G.1 - Guiding a pollution response vessel
G.2 - An example of guidance during the Prestige response

 

H RECONNAISSANCE REPORT

H.1 - Mapping pollution
H.2 - Estimating the quantity of pollutant
H.3 - Degree of coverage: reference plates
H.4 - POLREP

 

I OTHER PRODUCTS AND MISTAKEN POLLUTION

 

 

The file below is an extract. To order the full version in electronic form, please send an email to: documentation@cedre.fr

Document

Reference
978-2-87893-083-5
Editor
Cedre
Date
30/04/2006
Paper version
not available (pdf: 25 €)